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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion. Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials. American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $712 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $108 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Apple and Hewlett-Packard– and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Jun 30 2015
Written by Jake Holmes | Posted on Automobile Mag

Dodge plans to ramp up availability of its 707-hp Hellcat supercharged V-8 engines for the 2016 model year after demand outstripped supply this year. Dodge is still building any 2015 Charger or Challenger Hellcat models already purchased, but stopped taking new orders several months ago after a "huge flood" of orders, Dodge and SRT brand president and CEO Tim Kuniskis told Automotive News.

"We're going to build more [Hellcats] for 2016," Kuniskis told AN. "It's a small sliver of what we sell, but it really creates a halo for the rest of the lineup."

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jun 29 2015
Written by Kelsey Mays | Posted on Cars

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles' Uconnect touch-screen system will get a host of updates for 2016, including better graphics, faster menus, a reconfigurable menu bar and Apple's Siri Eyes Free integration.

Jun 29 2015
Written by Brian White | Posted on Pioneer News

Chevrolet is apparently looking to beat out the Tesla 3 with a more affordable 200-mile electric car. Currently, the General Motors company (the parent of Chevrolet) is testing a new electric prototype at its Milford Proving Ground where the GM data center—a place that is powered solely by the company’s vehicle’s recycled batteries.

Perhaps Chevrolet is in direct competition with Tesla, to release a more affordable electric vehicle, or perhaps the company is just looking to get ahead of the electric vehicle trend that is obviously on its way.

Jun 26 2015
Written by Anita Lienert | Posted on Edmunds

Special versions of the 2016 Chrysler 200 and Chrysler 300 sedans and the 2016 Chrysler Town & Country minivan celebrating the brand's 90th anniversary will begin arriving at Chrysler dealerships this summer, the automaker said.

"Anniversary packages will be offered on the volume models, adding value," said Fiat-Chrysler in a statement on Tuesday.

Fiat-Chrysler spokeswoman Kathy Graham told Edmunds that pricing will be announced soon.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jun 26 2015
Written by Greg Gardner, | Posted on Detroit Free Press

The 2016 Chevrolet Cruze is longer, lighter and gets about 40 m.p.g. from its 1.4-liter, four-cylinder Ecotec turbo engine.

Slated to go on sale in spring of 2016, the Cruze will be the fifth redesigned car model Chevrolet is launching in 2015 and early next year with the goal of restoring a reputation it enjoyed in the 1950s and '60s.

Earlier this year, Chevy unveiled redesigned versions of the Volt, Camaro, Malibu and Spark.

General Motors CEO Mary Barra took the cover off the new Cruze Wednesday night at the Fillmore Detroit.