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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion. Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials. American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $712 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $108 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Apple and Hewlett-Packard– and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Apr 22 2015
Chrysler Media Group

Mopar will give a helping hand to young drivers in the Detroit area with an advanced driving program called "Mopar Road Ready," designed to teach safe and defensive driving techniques. Sponsored by the FCA Foundation and supported by Mopar, the program dedicated to training and educating teenage drivers will be available to those between the ages of 15-19 with a learner's or driver's license and at least 30 hours of driving experience.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Apr 21 2015
Written by Patrick Rall | Posted on Torque News

There have been a variety of aspects of the new Ford Shelby GT350 Mustang left a mystery by the automaker since the 2014 Los Angeles Auto Show debut last year and one of those mysteries is the model year of the new GT350. At first, it was believed that it would be a 2016 model year, following up the 2015 debut model year, but if that was the case, then why didn’t Ford just call it the 2016 GT350? Well, a comment made by a Ford executive about there being a special reason for the delay in announcing the model year got us all thinking.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Apr 20 2015
Written by Michael Wayland | Posted on The Detroit News

Jeep wants to ensure drivers that although the Renegade is the smallest vehicle the brand has built, it's still up for urban and off-roading adventures.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV on Friday is launching its first ad campaign for the subcompact SUV in true Jeep fashion, with a national 60-second TV ad featuring adventure-seeking youths driving Renegades down city streets, snowy terrain and beaches.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Apr 17 2015
Written by Brent Snavely and James Healey | Posted on Detroit Free Press

Chevrolet marketing boss Tim Mahoney said Bolt is a terrific name for an electric car even if it is almost indistinguishable from the Volt name that Chevy already uses for an extended-range electric on sale now.

Mahoney said he approved the Bolt name, and said, "the decision is made. The name won't be changed."

The Bolt, unveiled in January at the Detroit auto show, will be a pure electric vehicle with a range of 200 miles. Some reports have said a change has been discussed to avoid confusion between the coming Bolt and Chevy Volt now on sale.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Apr 15 2015
Written by Greg Gardner | Posted on Detroit Free Press

Chevrolet is cutting the price of its 2015 Spark electric vehicle by $1,650 and offering additional incentives to boost sales in California, Oregon and Maryland, the only states where the battery-powered car is sold.

Buyers in California and Maryland can qualify for state tax credits of $2,500 and $2,300, respectively, on top of a $7,500 federal tax credit.

In addition, cash rebates are available in California ($1,000), Maryland ($1,200) and Oregon ($3,000).

After the credits and rebates, the Spark EV can be purchased for $14,995.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy